If you have read our previous articles you would know the importance of writing and the benefits of handwriting. But if you are wondering how to get your children to write, then we have come up with 4 easy to enforce activities that your child will also enjoy.

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These activities will groom your child’s comprehension and articulation, and help them to excel in all subjects, not just English. This is because almost all subjects, and almost all careers, require you to efficiently convey meanings and ideas. Use these fun activities to gift your child another skill they will surely thank you for!

Diary/Journal Writing:

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Getting your child a diary or journal is an inexpensive, convenient, time-tested method to get children to write. This does not have to be a daily affair. You can ask your child to write in their diary a minimum of three or four times in a week. They can write as long or as little as they want. You can keep a watch on them initially to make sure that they are writing, but it is important that you do not read their diary entries. This would only discourage them from writing.

Make a Scrapbook:

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Making a scrapbook will engage your child’s visual and tactile senses. You can encourage them to cut out pictures they like from magazines and newspapers or even make collages using colourful cuttings. They can paste photographs, leaves, flowers and anything else that matters to them on their scrapbook. Following this you can either choose to make them caption their scraps or you can ask them to use that as an idea or prompt to write an independent piece. The scrap can just be a feature image that supports your child’s writing. The opposite is also possible, where your child can write and then find images and articles that can be stuck on the book to support the writing.

Write Together:

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I don’t know if you write. If you do, you should definitely write with your child (If you don’t, maybe you should consider writing!). You should also consider writing for your child. You and your child can write for each other and then narrate it. This can be a story, a letter or a poem. You should also practice writing to each other on important days like birthdays, teachers’ day, mothers’ day or fathers’ day. Thoughtful greeting cards and messages always make for a great gift, and they will teach your child to express their emotions and feelings through writing.

‘Convince Me’ Letters:

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I am sure that you and your child would disagree on a bunch of stuff on a regular basis. Maybe your child wants to get a pet, a new toy, a new book, go on a vacation, and you have found reasons to decline their request. Well, not so fast! Why not ask them to write a letter to try to convince you to let them have what they want. This will hone your child’s rhetorical and persuasive skills, teach them to arrange their thoughts in a structured manner and employ logic and reasoning in their writing. All of these are invaluable skills. They will also help your child understand that they’ll get what they want if their demands are reasonable, and if they are willing to put thought and effort into it.